Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Is It Bullying? What Is It?

Bullying is a word that gets thrown around a lot these days when anything goes wrong between peers.  It is our job to make sure students understand what constitutes bullying in order for them to use it appropriately when uncomfortable or unsafe circumstances arise.

With my fourth graders I handed out a quick 10-question true/false survey to find out what they already knew about bullying:

Then I created a chart, inspired by fellow blogger Mrs. Sinclair, that clearly identified the differences between teasing, conflict, a mean moment and bullying.  You can download a copy of it here.

After discussing this, I elaborated further on the definition of bullying by using Savvy School Counselor's "The A, B, C, and D of Bullying" poster:



I called out different scenarios and had each table discuss and come to consensus on where it feel on the chart.  We spent time debating and advocating for where it would best fit under by utilizing the criteria for each.  Some examples included: 
  • Martin called Tom a freak.
  • Each morning Sam tells Jarod he has to let him copy his homework or Sam will embarrass him in front of the whole class
  • Sue rolled her eyes at Kendra when she walked into the room
  • Every day at lunch Sarah tells Joan whom she can sit with at lunch
Finally, we went through the original bullying survey to see how accurate we were and if we had any further questions.  I made students a copy of both the handouts as well as printing out a color poster of each for the teacher to post in the room.

24 comments:

  1. Hello! Your "Is it Bullying? What is it?" poster is perfect! Definitely something I could use with my kids. Would you be willing and able to send me the poster file? my email is ktbrink24@gmail.com thank you for this very helpful resource!

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    1. Yes, definitely! I'm glad you can use it!

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  2. Would you please email me "Is it Bullying? What is it?" poster as well. Thank you for sharing. My email is jantrey.meyer@egsd.org

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  3. Hi,
    Thanks for this great bullying lesson! I'm a K-3 counselor, but would really like to have a copy of your Is It Bullying? chart. Please send it to tobin.keeth@stpsb.org. Thanks so much! :)

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  4. I agree, this poster is perfect. Would you be willing to send me the poster file also? My email address is cjones@cnusd.k12.ca.us Thank you

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  5. I've added a link to the post so that you can download the pdf from this page :)

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  6. Hello! I'd love to hear about how you explain the "unequal balance of power" part. I'm a little hesitant about telling the students that some have more "power" than others. While the bigger vs. smaller and older vs. younger is easy, acknowledging that some students are more popular (well-liked by their peers) than others doesn't sound so great. How do you handle this? cottrill.sara@gmail.com

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    1. Hi Sara!

      I usually start with the bigger vs. smaller and older vs. younger analogies, and I also include a group vs. an individual. Another way that connects with students is describing the imbalance of power as someone trying to "control" you. We reinforce that no one is in control of you but yourself. We make our own choices when it comes to behaviors and words - there is no puppet master. At recess we had some incidents of one student telling other students what to do (such as who they can play with, what they can play, where they can play, etc.). This was a great example that illustrates the imbalance of power.

      Also, imbalance can be explained as the difference between a "back and forth" conflict or "one-sided" conflict. If student A does something to student B, then student B does something to student A, then student A does something to student B, and so on...that is not an imbalance of power - both students have an equal part. If it's always student A doing something to student B, over and over - this would be an imbalance of power. I hope this helps! :)

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  7. Love this! Could you please email me a copy of the poster as well? Renata.schnarr@gmail.com

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    1. I've added a link to the post so that you can download the pdf from this page :)

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  8. I would also like a copy of your poster and lesson. jlashell@cloverpark.k12.wa.us

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    1. I've added a link to the post so that you can download the pdf from this page :)

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  9. Your website inspires me! Thank you for all of the work you have put into this! Would you mind sending me the "Bullying Poster?" Many thanks! maryellen.santerre@leanderisd.org

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    1. I've added a link to the post so that you can download the pdf from this page :)

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  10. HI there

    Thanks so much - your things are great. I would also like the link to your bully poster. Cheryl
    cheryl.carey@irsd.k12.de.us

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    1. Thank you! :) There is a link in the blog posting above that you can click on to download it.

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  11. I am a K_8th grade school counselor and I teach bullying lessons every year. This poster/ information would be very helpful. My email is hobbs@phusd.k12.ca.us.
    Thank you!
    Jill Hobbs

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  12. Hi there,
    I am a K-8th grade school counselor and I teach bullying lessons every year. This poster/ information would be very helpful with the lessons. My email is hobbs@phusd.k12.ca.us.
    Thank you,
    Jill Hobbs

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  13. Hello there! I love your bullying lesson and your poster it's really a great help. Thank you so much!!!

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  14. Could I please get a copy of the Is it Bullying poster?

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    1. Hi Amy, it is linked in the text above the graphic in the blog post.

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